$100,000 infield

The $100,000 infield was the infield of the Philadelphia Athletics in the early 1910s. The $100,000 infield consisted of first baseman Stuffy McInnis, second baseman Eddie Collins, shortstop Jack Barry and third baseman Frank "Home Run" Baker.[1][2] According to the Encyclopædia Britannica, the nickname reflects "the purported combined market value of the foursome,"[3] which is equivalent to about $2.7 million in 2018.

Baseball historian Bill James rated the 1914 edition of the $100,000 infield the greatest infield of all time, and also ranked the 1912 and 1913 editions in the top five all time.[1] The $100,000 infield helped the Athletics win four American League championships in five years—1910, 1911, 1913 and 1914—and win the World Series in 1910, 1911 and 1913. The group was broken up after losing the 1914 World Series as a result of the financial pressures resulting from the emergence of the Federal League.[4] Two members—Collins and Baker—have been inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame.[5]

Eddie Collins 1911
$100,000 infield second baseman Eddie Collins

Eddie Collins

Collins was the first member of the $100,000 infield to join the Athletics. He debuted on September 17, 1906, after playing college ball at Columbia University.[6] In 1906 and 1907, he played 20 games for the Athletics, mostly at shortstop.[6] In 1908, he took over as the Athletics' regular second baseman, replacing Danny Murphy, who moved to the outfield.[2] During the $100,000 infield years from 1910 to 1914, he played 738 games, getting 922 hits in 2,677 at bats for a batting average of .344.[6] He led the American League in runs in 1912, 1913 and 1914, stolen bases in 1910, singles in 1913 and times on base in 1914.[6] He also finished in the top ten in the American League in batting average, on-base percentage, hits, stolen bases, singles and times on base every year from 1910 through 1914.[6] In addition, he finished in the top ten in American Most Valuable Player voting every year from 1911 through 1914, winning the Most Valuable Player award in 1914.[6] He was sold to the Chicago White Sox after the 1914 season as Athletics' manager Connie Mack attempted to respond to the financial pressures brought on by the newly formed Federal League, breaking up the $100,000 infield.[2][4][7] He returned to Mack and the Athletics in 1927, finishing his career playing 12 games for the Athletics in their 1929 and 1930 World Championship seasons.[6] He was elected to the Hall of Fame in 1939.[6][8]

Jack Barry

Jack Barry
Jack Barry, $100,000 infield shortstop

Barry was the next to join the Athletics, debuting on July 13, 1908, after playing for the College of the Holy Cross.[9][10] Between 1910 and 1914, Barry played 686 games for the Athletics, getting 607 hits in 2,334 at bats for a batting average of .260.[9] He finished in the American League top ten in sacrifice hits every year from 1911 through 1914, and ranked fifth in the American League in runs batted in in 1913.[9] But his primary contributions were on defense, where he had a strong arm, enormous range and sure hands, and was able to work out innovative plays with his good friend Collins, such as a defense against the double steal.[10] He finished in the top 20 in Most Valuable Player voting every year from 1911 through 1914, with his best showing a ninth-place finish in 1913.[9] He was sold to the Boston Red Sox in the middle of the 1915 season, where he moved to second base and played on the Red Sox' 1915 and 1916 World Championship teams.[11][12] He missed the Red Sox 1918 Championship season due to service in the U.S. Navy.[10]

Frank "Home Run" Baker

Frank Baker
Frank Baker, the $100,000 infield's third baseman

Baker also joined the Athletics in 1908, debuting on September 21.[13] He became the Athletics regular third baseman in 1909, and led the American League in triples that season.[13] Between 1910 and 1914, Baker played 742 games for the Athletics, getting 929 hits in 2,864 at bats for a batting average of .324.[13] He led the American League in home runs every year from 1911 through 1914, and led the league in runs batted in during 1912 and 1913.[13] He also finished in the top ten in batting average, slugging percentage, on-base percentage and times on base every year from 1911 through 1914, and finished in the top ten in runs scored, hits, doubles, total bases, extra base hits and runs batted in every year from 1910 through 1914.[13] He finished in the top ten in the American League Most Valuable Player voting every year from 1911 through 1914, finishing third in 1914, his highest showing.[13] Baker was the hero of the 1911 World Series, hitting two home runs to help the Athletics win the series, which earned him the nickname "Home Run" Baker.[4][14] Baker held out the 1915 season when manager and owner Connie Mack refused to increase his salary, and was sold to the New York Yankees in 1916 after American League president Ban Johnson intervened.[14] He finished his career as the third baseman for the Yankees pennant-winning teams in 1921 and 1922.[13] Baker was elected to the Hall of Fame in 1955.[13][15]

Stuffy McInnis

Stuffy McInnis
First baseman Stuffy McInnis

McInnis was the final member of the $100,000 infield to join. He started his career as an 18-year-old little-used backup infielder for the Athletics in 1909, and played a little more in 1910.[16][17] In 1909 and 1910, he played more games backing up Barry at shortstop than at any other position.[16][17] Before the 1911 season, Mack decided to make McInnis his regular first baseman, replacing the popular veteran Harry Davis, although McInnis did have to begin the season as the Athletics' shortstop when Barry became ill before taking over at first base.[17] Defensively as a first baseman, he was known for having exceptional reach.[18] Between 1910 and 1914, McInnis played 614 games for the Athletics, getting 715 hits in 2,228 at bats for a batting average of .321.[16] He led the American League in singles in 1914, and finished in the top ten in batting average, hits, total bases, runs batted in and singles every year from 1912 through 1914. In both 1912 and 1913, he also finished in the top ten in slugging percentage and on-base percentage.[16] He received Most Valuable Player votes every season from 1911 through 1914, finishing seventh in both 1913 and 1914.[16] McInnis is the only member of the $100,000 infield to remain with the Athletics beyond 1915. He was eventually traded to the Boston Red Sox in 1918 in exchange for Larry Gardner, Hick Cady and Tilly Walker, where he played on Boston's 1918 World Championship team.[16][19] He also reteamed with Barry on the 1919 Boston Red Sox.[20] Before finishing his career in 1927 he also played with the Cleveland Indians, Boston Braves, Pittsburgh Pirates and Philadelphia Phillies.[16]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b James, B. (2001). The New Bill James Historical Baseball Abstract. Simon & Schuster. pp. 548–550. ISBN 0-684-80697-5.
  2. ^ a b c Mittermeyer, P. (2006). "Edward Trowbridge Collins". In Jones, D. (ed.). Deadball Stars of the American League. Potomac Books. pp. 610–613. ISBN 978-1-57488-982-6.
  3. ^ Augustyn, A. "Oakland A's". Encyclopædia Britannica. Retrieved November 16, 2014.
  4. ^ a b c Neyer, R.; Epstein, E. (2000). "1911 Philadelphia Athletics". Baseball Dynasties. W. W. Norton. pp. 45–63. ISBN 0-393-32008-1.
  5. ^ "List of Hall of Famers". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. March 4, 2008. Archived from the original on March 30, 2008. Retrieved December 3, 2010.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h "Eddie Collins". Baseball-Reference.com. Archived from the original on February 15, 2009. Retrieved February 19, 2009.
  7. ^ James, B. (2001). The New Bill James Historical Baseball Abstract. Simon & Schuster. p. 483. ISBN 0-684-80697-5.
  8. ^ "Collins, Eddie". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved December 3, 2010.
  9. ^ a b c d "Jack Barry". Baseball-Reference.com. Archived from the original on February 9, 2009. Retrieved February 19, 2009.
  10. ^ a b c Macht, N. (2006). "John Joseph Barry". In Jones, D. (ed.). Deadball Stars of the American League. Potomac Books. pp. 625–626. ISBN 978-1-57488-982-6.
  11. ^ "1915 World Series". Baseball-Reference.com. Archived from the original on October 15, 2008. Retrieved February 19, 2009.
  12. ^ "1916 Boston Red Sox". Baseball-Reference.com. Archived from the original on February 15, 2009. Retrieved February 19, 2009.
  13. ^ a b c d e f g h "Frank Baker". Baseball-Reference.com. Archived from the original on February 8, 2009. Retrieved February 19, 2009.
  14. ^ a b Jones, D. (2006). "John Franklin "Home Run" Baker". In Jones, D. (ed.). Deadball Stars of the American League. Potomac Books. pp. 620–624. ISBN 978-1-57488-982-6.
  15. ^ "Frank Baker HOF". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved December 3, 2010.
  16. ^ a b c d e f g "Suffy McInnis". Baseball-Reference.com. Archived from the original on February 17, 2009. Retrieved February 19, 2009.
  17. ^ a b c Davis, A.; Rogers, C.P. (2006). "John Phalen "Stuffy" McInnis". In Jones, D. (ed.). Deadball Stars of the American League. Potomac Books. pp. 629–631. ISBN 978-1-57488-982-6.
  18. ^ James, B. (2001). The New Bill James Historical Baseball Abstract. Simon & Schuster. p. 460. ISBN 0-684-80697-5.
  19. ^ "1918 World Series". Baseball-Reference.com. Archived from the original on February 16, 2009. Retrieved February 19, 2009.
  20. ^ "1919 Boston Red Sox". Baseball-Reference.com. Archived from the original on February 10, 2009. Retrieved February 19, 2009.
100000 (disambiguation)

100,000, 100000, 10,0000, 1,00000, 1E5, 105, hundred thousand, ten myriad or variant, may refer to:

100000 (number), the decimal number "100000" and values associated with that range and magnitude

$100,000, a denomination of money circulated by the United States

100,000-year problem, a climatological records problem

Project 100,000, a Vietnam-era US Army recruiting program

For the year 100,000 AD see Timeline of the far future

1911 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1911 Philadelphia Athletics season was a season in American baseball. The A's finished first in the American League with a record of 101 wins and 50 losses, then went on to defeat the New York Giants in the 1911 World Series, four games to two, for their second straight World Championship.

Starting in 1911, the team was known for its "$100,000 infield", consisting of John "Stuffy" McInnis (first base), Eddie Collins (second base), Jack Barry (shortstop), and Frank "Home Run" Baker (third base) as well as pitchers Eddie Plank and Charles "Chief" Bender.

1913 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1913 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing first in the American League with a record of 96 wins and 57 losses. The team then defeated the New York Giants in the 1913 World Series, 4 games to 1.

In 2001, baseball historian Bill James ranked the 1913 incarnation of the Athletics' famous "$100,000 infield" as the best of all time in major league history (first baseman Stuffy McInnis, second baseman Eddie Collins, third baseman Frank "Home Run" Baker, shortstop Jack Barry).

1960 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1960 throughout the world.

1961 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1961 throughout the world.

1963 Major League Baseball season

The 1963 Major League Baseball season was contested from April 8 to October 6, 1963. The American League and National League both featured ten teams, with each team playing a 162-game schedule.

In the World Series the Los Angeles Dodgers swept the New York Yankees in four straight games. The Dodgers' stellar pitching staff, anchored by left-hander Sandy Koufax and right-hander Don Drysdale, was so dominant that the vaunted Yankees, despite the presence of sluggers such as Mickey Mantle and Roger Maris in their lineup, never took a lead against Los Angeles the entire Series.

1963 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1963 throughout the world.

Big Three (Oakland Athletics)

The Big Three was a trio of Major League Baseball starting pitchers for the Oakland Athletics from 2000-2004. The Big Three consisted of Tim Hudson, Mark Mulder, and Barry Zito. Each pitcher in the Big Three was drafted by the Athletics and they played their first couple of years together with the Athletics before splitting up. The Big Three helped the Athletics win three AL West Division titles during their five years together.

Connie Mack

Cornelius McGillicuddy (December 22, 1862 – February 8, 1956), better known as Connie Mack, was an American professional baseball catcher, manager, and team owner. The longest-serving manager in Major League Baseball history, he holds records for wins (3,731), losses (3,948), and games managed (7,755), with his victory total being almost 1,000 more than any other manager.

Mack managed the Philadelphia Athletics for the club's first 50 seasons of play, starting in 1901, before retiring at age 87 following the 1950 season, and was at least part-owner from 1901 to 1954. He was the first manager to win the World Series three times, and is the only manager to win consecutive Series on separate occasions (1910–11, 1929–30); his five Series titles remain the third most by any manager, and his nine American League pennants rank second in league history. However, constant financial struggles forced repeated rebuilding of the roster, and Mack's teams also finished in last place 17 times. Mack was elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame at Cooperstown, New York in 1937.

Dynasty (sports)

In sports, a dynasty is a team or individual that dominates their sport or league for an extended length of time. Some leagues maintain official lists of dynasties, often as part of a hall of fame, but in many cases, whether a team or individual has achieved a dynasty is subjective. This can result in frequent topic of debate among sports fans due to lack of consensus and agreement in the many different variables and criteria that fans may use to define a sports dynasty. Merriam-Webster describes a dynasty as a "sports franchise which has a prolonged run of successful seasons". Within the same sport, or even the same league, dynasties may be concurrent with each other.

Eddie Collins

Edward Trowbridge Collins Sr. (May 2, 1887 – March 25, 1951), nicknamed "Cocky", was an American professional baseball player, manager and executive. He played as a second baseman in Major League Baseball from 1906 to 1930 for the Philadelphia Athletics and Chicago White Sox. A graduate of Columbia University, Collins holds major league career records in several categories and is among the top few players in several other categories. In 1925, Collins became just the sixth person to join the 3,000 hit club – and the last for the next 17 seasons. His 47 career home runs mark the lowest home run total for a member of the aforementioned 3,000 hit club.

Collins coached and managed in the major leagues after retiring as a player. He also served as general manager of the Boston Red Sox. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1939.

History of the Philadelphia Athletics

The Oakland Athletics, a current Major League Baseball franchise, originated in Philadelphia. This article details the history of the Philadelphia Athletics, from 1901 to 1954, when they moved to Kansas City.

Home Run Baker

John Franklin "Home Run" Baker (March 13, 1886 – June 28, 1963) was an American professional baseball player. A third baseman, Baker played in Major League Baseball from 1908 to 1922, for the Philadelphia Athletics and the New York Yankees. Baker has been called the "original home run king of the majors".Baker was a member of the Athletics' $100,000 infield. He helped the Athletics win the 1910, 1911 and 1913 World Series. After a contract dispute, the Athletics sold Baker to the Yankees, where he and Wally Pipp helped the Yankees' offense. Baker appeared with the Yankees in the 1921 and 1922 World Series, though the Yankees lost both series, before retiring.

Baker led the American League in home runs for four consecutive years, from 1911 through 1914. He had a batting average over .300 in six seasons, had three seasons with more than 100 runs batted in, and two seasons with over 100 runs scored. Baker's legacy has grown over the years, and he is regarded by many as one of the best power hitters of the deadball era. During his 13 years as a major league player, Baker never played a single inning at any position other than third base. Baker was elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame by the Veterans Committee in 1955.

Jack Barry (baseball)

John Joseph "Jack" Barry (April 26, 1887 – April 23, 1961) was an American shortstop, second baseman, and manager in Major League Baseball, and later a college baseball coach. From 1908 through 1919, Barry played for the Philadelphia Athletics (1908–15) and Boston Red Sox (1915–19).

Joe Judge

Joseph Ignatius Judge (May 25, 1894 – March 11, 1963) was an American first baseman in Major League Baseball who played most of his career for the Washington Senators. He set American League records for career games (2,056), putouts (19,021), assists (1,284), total chances (20,444), double plays (1,476) and fielding percentage (.993) at first base, and led the AL in fielding average five times, then a record. He also batted over .300 nine times, and hit .385 in the 1924 World Series as the Senators won their only championship. At the end of his career he ranked tenth in AL history in hits (2,328) and doubles (431), seventh in games played (2,129), eighth in triples (158) and at bats (7,786), and ninth in walks (958).

Oakland Athletics

The Oakland Athletics, often referred to as the A's, are an American professional baseball team based in Oakland, California. They compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the American League (AL) West division. The team plays its home games at the RingCentral Coliseum. They have won nine World Series championships.

One of the American League's eight charter franchises, the team was founded in Philadelphia in 1901 as the Philadelphia Athletics. They won three World Series championships from 1910 to 1913 and back-to-back titles in 1929 and 1930. The team's owner and manager for its first 50 years was Connie Mack and Hall of Fame players included Chief Bender, Frank "Home Run" Baker, Jimmie Foxx, and Lefty Grove. The team left Philadelphia for Kansas City in 1955 and became the Kansas City Athletics before moving to Oakland in 1968. They won three consecutive World Championships between 1972 and 1974, led by players including Vida Blue, Catfish Hunter, Reggie Jackson, ace reliever Rollie Fingers, and colorful owner Charlie O. Finley. After being sold by Finley to Walter A. Haas Jr., the team won three consecutive pennants and the 1989 World Series behind the "Bash Brothers", Jose Canseco and Mark McGwire, as well as Hall of Famers Dennis Eckersley, Rickey Henderson and manager Tony La Russa.

From 1901 to 2018, the Athletics' overall win–loss record is 8,931–9,387 (.488).

Shibe Park

Shibe Park, known later as Connie Mack Stadium, was a baseball park located in Philadelphia. It was the home of the Philadelphia Athletics of the American League (AL) and the Philadelphia Phillies of the National League (NL). When it opened April 12, 1909, it became baseball's first steel-and-concrete stadium. In different eras it was home to "The $100,000 Infield", "The Whiz Kids", and "The 1964 Phold". The venue's two home teams won both the first and last games at the stadium: the Athletics beat the Boston Red Sox 8–1 on opening day 1909, while the Phillies beat the Montreal Expos 2–1 on October 1, 1970, in the park's final contest.

Shibe Park stood on the block bounded by Lehigh Avenue, 20th Street, Somerset Street and 21st Street. It was five blocks west, corner-to-corner, from the Baker Bowl, the Phillies' home from 1887 to 1938. The stadium hosted eight World Series and two MLB All-Star Games, in 1943 and 1952, with the latter game holding the distinction of being the only All-Star contest shortened by rain (to five innings). In May 1939, it was the site of the first night game played in the American League.

Phillies Hall-of-Fame centerfielder and longtime broadcaster Richie Ashburn remembered Shibe Park: "It looked like a ballpark. It smelled like a ballpark. It had a feeling and a heartbeat, a personality that was all baseball."

Stuffy McInnis

John Phalen "Stuffy" McInnis (September 19, 1890 – February 16, 1960) was a first baseman and manager in Major League Baseball.

McInnis gained his nickname as a youngster in the Boston suburban leagues, where his spectacular playing brought shouts of "that's the stuff, kid".

From 1909-27, McInnis played for the Philadelphia Athletics (1909–17), Boston Red Sox (1918–21), Cleveland Indians (1922), Boston Braves (1923–24), Pittsburgh Pirates (1925–26) and Philadelphia Phillies (1927). He batted and threw right-handed.

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