Studio City, Los Angeles

Studio City is a neighborhood in the city of Los Angeles, California, in the San Fernando Valley. It is named after the studio lot that was established in the area by film producer Mack Sennett in 1927, now known as CBS Studio Center.

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Ventura and Laurel Canyon boulevards, July 2008
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Studio City is located in San Fernando Valley

History

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Map of the Lankershim Ranch properties, 1887

Originally known as Laurelwood, the area Studio City occupies was formerly part of Rancho Ex-Mission San Fernando. This land changed hands several times during the late 19th Century and was eventually owned by James Boon Lankershim (1850–1931), and eight other developers who organized the Lankershim Ranch Land and Water Company. In 1899, however, the area lost most water rights to Los Angeles and therefore subdivision and sale of land for farming became untenable.

Construction of the Los Angeles Aqueduct began in 1908 and water reached the San Fernando Valley in November, 1913. Real estate boomed, and a syndicate led by Harry Chandler, business manager of the Los Angeles Times, with Hobart Johnstone Whitley, Isaac Van Nuys, and James Boon Lankershim acquired the remaining 47,500 acres (192 km2) of the southern half of the former Mission lands—everything west of the Lankershim town limits and south of present-day Roscoe Boulevard excepting the Rancho Encino. Whitley platted the area of present-day Studio City from portions of the existing town of Lankershim as well as the eastern part of the new acquisition.

In 1927, Mack Sennett began building a new studio on 20 acres donated by the land developer. The area around the studio was named Studio City.

In 1955, Studio City's Station 78 became the first racially integrated station in the Los Angeles City Fire Department.

Population

The 2000 U.S. census counted 34,034 residents in the 6.31-square-mile Studio City neighborhood—5,395 people per square mile, among the lowest population densities for the city but about average for the county. In 2008, the city estimated that the resident population had increased to 37,201.

In 2000, the median age for residents, 38, was considered old for city and county neighborhoods; the percent of residents age 19 and older were among the county's highest.

The neighborhood was considered "not especially diverse" ethnically, with a high percent of White residents. The breakdown was whites, 78%; Latinos, 8.7%; Asians, 5.4% ; blacks, 3.7%; and others, 4.1%. Iran (7%) and the United Kingdom (6.7%) were the most common places of birth for the 21.1% of the residents who were born abroad—a low percentage for Los Angeles.

The median yearly household income in 2008 dollars was $75,657, considered high for the city. The percent of households earning $125,000 and up was high for Los Angeles County. The average household size of 1.9 people was low when compared to the rest of the city and the county. Renters occupied 55.9% of the housing stock and house- or apartment-owners held 44.1%.

In 2000, there were 837 families headed by single parents, the rate of 11.2% being low for the city of Los Angeles. There were 2,591 veterans, 8.8% of the population, a high figure for the city.

Geography

According to the Mapping L.A. project of the Los Angeles Times, Studio City is bordered on the north by Valley Village, on the east by Toluca Lake and Universal City, on the south by Hollywood Hills West, on the southwest by Beverly Crest and on the west by Sherman Oaks.

Nearby places

Relation of Studio City to nearby places, not necessarily contiguous:

Notable people

Film and television

Music

Other

Education

Almost half of Studio City residents aged 25 and older (49.4%) had earned a four-year degree by 2000, a high percentage for both the city and the county. The percentages of those residents with a master's degree was also high for the county.

Schools

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Athletic field at Upper Campus, Harvard-Westlake School

Schools within the Studio City boundaries are:

Public library

Parks and recreation

The Studio City Recreation Center (also known as Beeman Park) is in Studio City. It has an auditorium, barbecue pits, a lighted baseball diamond, an outdoor running and walking track, lighted outdoor basketball courts, a children's play area, picnic tables, unlighted tennis courts, and many programs and classes including the second-largest youth baseball program in the public parks. Moorpark Park, an unstaffed pocket park in Studio City, has a children's play area and picnic tables. Woodbridge Park on the eastern border of Studio City has a children and toddler's play area. Wilacre Park, an unstaffed park, is in Studio City. In addition, Studio City has the Studio City Mini-Park, an unstaffed pocket park.

Notable places

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Studio City Theater, now a Barnes & Noble branch

Local government officials

Studio City is part of the city of Los Angeles and sits entirely within City Council District 2, which is represented by Los Angeles City Councilman Paul Krekorian.

Studio City is represented to the city of Los Angeles by the Studio City Neighborhood Council, one of 90 such Neighborhood Councils in the city created and funded by the city of Los Angeles.

The area is also represented by Los Angeles County District 3 Supervisor Sheila Kuehl, State Senator Robert Hertzberg, Studio City is located in the new 18th District covering most of the Eastern San Fernando Valley, California state Assemblyman Adrin Nazarian and U.S. Rep. Brad Sherman.

Content from Wikipedia